Famo Feeds News

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  • Prime Cuts - Under Pressure: Types of Bloat in Cattle

    Bloat is simply a buildup of gas that cannot be expelled. Amazingly, this trapped air can be fatal to both calves and adult cattle. As gases begin to accumulate, the abdomen becomes hyperdistended which can easily be spotted during herd checks.   Read More...

  • Prime Cuts: Urinary Calculi

    Urinary calculi refer to mineral deposits in the urinary tract that can eventually block the passing of urine. These stones are common in cattle, sheep and goats. Obstruction by urinary calculi can cause urine retention, bladder distention, abdominal pain, and ultimately bladder rupture leading to death.   Read More...

  • Prime Cuts: Feedlot Foot Problems

    Hoof problems can occur at any time of year in the feedlot, though we typically associate them with the warm, muddy conditions of spring and early summer. There are various conditions that cause hoof problems and lameness in feedlot cattle, not all of which are responsive to antibiotic treatment.Causes of Lameness:Foot RotCaused by Fusobacterium necrophorum, which is common in mud and manure.Foot rot can occur year-round. Bacteria rely on skin breakdown to penetrate the foot to attack deeper tis...  Read More...

  • Prime Cuts: Ringworm

    Ringworm is a fungal infection of the hair and skin occurring in many different species including humans. These fungal infections typically look worse than they are and cause little, if any, permanent damage. However, show animals displaying active lesions are barred from shows and exhibitions due to the highly infections nature of the disease.PresentationIn cattle, ringworm lesions typically occur on the head and neck, but in more severe cases can be found over the entire body.   Read More...

  • Prime Cuts: Calf Creep Feeding Strategies

    Creep feeding is an economical practice designed to close the nutritional gap that exists for calves consuming pasture and milk. Because of larger birth weights and a greater potential for gain, pasture and milk can no longer nutritionally support the genetic growth potential of today’s calves.Starting Calves on Creep FeedEncouraging creep feed intake early on in young calves is beneficial to their growth potential as feed conversion is greatest in younger cattle. However, young calves can...  Read More...

  • Prime Cuts: Calf Creep Feeding

    There are not many management tools that are as economical as creep feeding. Commonly used by cow calf producers, creep feed is provided to nursing calves in a manner that does not allow for the adult cows to access it. The nutrients supplemented by the creep feed allow calves to grow at a rate closer to their genetic potential.   Read More...

  • Hoof Health in Dairy Cows

    At times, hoof health can take a back seat to the numerous other tasks going on during the average day on the dairy. However, hoof health should always be a top priority day to day. Hoof problems cause a domino effect, ultimately leading to lower production and profitability.   Read More...

  • Common Calfhood Diseases

    Diarrhea causing pathogens tend to strike at different ages, therefore, the age at which diarrhea strikes provides a clue as to what disease we are dealing with. The chart below indicates what pathogen is likely to present itself in preweaned calves. By determining the likely pathogen, the correct course of intervention can be utilized.   Read More...

  • Caring for Calves in Cold Weather

    Calves are very susceptible to the stresses of cold weather. At birth, calves only have about 3% body fat! Getting and keeping them warm from birth to weaning is critical to their survival.   Read More...

  • Drugs Entering Veterinary Feed Directive Status

    Beginning January 1, 2017 the following drugs will transition from Over-the-Counter status to Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD) status. Be aware that this list may change at any time so please visit the FDA guidance website for the most up-to-date listing of affected drugs at: http://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/ucm071807.htmDrugs transitioning to VFD statusDrug NameExample Brand NamesChlortetracyclineAureomycin, CLTC, CTC, Chloratet, Chlorachel, ChlorMax, Chlortetracycl...  Read More...

  • Preparing for the Veterinary Feed Directive

    January 1st is fast approaching and the pressure of the upcoming Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD) is on. Preparation is key for this new regulation. Make sure you have considered the following before January is upon us:What is your relationship with your veterinarian?Do you currently have a veterinarian that works with your facility?   Read More...

  • Certifications: What They Mean to You

    Famo Feeds is Safe Feed/Safe Food, HACCP, and FCI certified. This means that you can count on both a quality product and a safe one as well. But, what do these certifications really mean?Safe Feed/Safe FoodThe Safe Feed/Safe Food certification signifies our compliance with total traceability of products.   Read More...

  • VFD - Requirements for Veterinarians 2015

    With the Veterinary Feed Directive coming into effect January 1, 2017, veterinarians are under significant pressure to be well-versed in the new regulations. This brochure was created by the FDA to help explain what is expected and what the implications are.VFD-DVM.pdf   Read More...

  • The Veterinary Feed Directive: What Does it mean for you?

    Beginning January 1, 2017, the Veterinary Feed Directive will take hold and change the game as we know it.  Getting Aureomycin pellets for sick calves will no longer be as easy as swinging over to the local feed store.  Times are changing.   Read More...

  • Walking the Calf Barn: What to Look for

    A lot can be learned from a simple walk through your calf barn, but how do you know what to look for? Here is a simple checklist to help you better read your calves. Remember, when walking through your calf pens, start with the youngest animals first and move through pens from youngest to oldest so that the risk of disease transmission from older to younger animals is diminished.   Read More...

  • Umbilical Uproar: Why Dipping Navels is Worth Your Time

    The cow has successfully calved. You’ve brought her water, you moved the calf into her own clean pen, and then what? The answer should be…dip the newborn calf’s navel.   Read More...

  • Feed Tags: Reading Between the Lines

    Looking at feed tags can be overwhelming. The technical jargon is seemingly designed to confuse and frustrate all who dare to read the tag. To help you navigate your feed tag, here is a list of commonly used feed additives and how they are defined within the ingredient statement.   Read More...

  • Prime Cuts: Consideration for High Moisture Corn, Ear Corn and Snaplage

    The popularity of high moisture corn and high moisture ear corn has been consistent for some time. Snaplage has had renewed interest as harvesting equipment, like snapper heads and kernel processors, have improved. Each of these has their advantages and disadvantages which should be weighed against what is feasible for your operation and what your specific goals are.   Read More...

  • Prime Cuts: Lick Tubs & Blocks

    Types   Lick tubs and blocks are designed to accommodate livestock species ranging from sheep and goats, to cattle, and horses. Tubs and blocks are designed to complement the feeding strategy currently in place and are available in various formulations to meet the needs of your program. There are 4 main types of tubs and blocks used: Low Moisture Formed by heating and rapidly cooling molasses that is then mixed with a designated premix before pouring into tubs to cool; creates a very hard e...  Read More...

  • Prime Cuts: Why Minerals Matter

    It is well established that livestock have certain mineral requirements; however, it is important to understand what those minerals do when choosing a program. Understanding how minerals affect the body may also help in spotting deficiencies and areas of improvement.   Cobalt – Necessary for vitamins B12 synthesis by rumen microbes.   Read More...

  • Prime Cuts: Preventing Diseases During Calving Season

    The last thing any producer needs in the middle of a busy calving season is a disease outbreak. As always, prevention is better than any medicine. To help you prepare and survive this next calving season, here is a checklist of what to consider:  Sanitation – Make this a priority not only before calving starts, but throughout the season, as well.   Read More...

  • Prime Cuts: Utilizing the Sandhills Calving Method

    In preparation for calving season, procedures to promote calf health need to be top priority. One of the main causes of death in young calves is diarrhea. Because of the incubation time for many diarrhea-causing pathogens, death loss typically occurs in 10 – 17 day old calves.   Read More...

  • Prime Cuts: Don't Skip Brood Cow Minerals

    Extensive work has been conducted showing the importance of energy and protein intake for late-gestation beef cows; however, mineral supplementation is often overlooked. Adequate mineral supplementation is necessary throughout the year, but is especially critical in the 60 days prior to calving through the end of breeding season. Not only does supplementation of minerals support the health and reproductive efficiency of the cow, but new research has suggested that resulting calves also experienc...  Read More...

  • Upright Silos

    When properly managed and cared for, upright silos provide excellent storage for fermented feeds. By combining the use of gravity for tight forage packing and a small area exposed to air, forage quality is preserved and waste is minimal. However, when poorly maintained they can quickly become a headache.   Read More...

  • Forage Management V: Fermentation

    Ensiling is a common way to store forages for dairy cattle. When done properly, ensiled forages can be stored for long periods of time and still maintain their quality. However, the ensiling process must proceed correctly in order for proper storage to be possible.   Read More...

  • Forage Management IV: Kernel Processing

    Corn silage is typically one of the main components of dairy cattle diets, often comprising between 20 to 40% of the diet dry matter. Since corn silage makes up such a large proportion of the diet, the quality of the corn silage is very important and can have a substantial impact on milk production levels. Corn silage quality can be affected by dry matter at harvest, packing density, and bunk covering but can also be altered by kernel processing.   Read More...

  • Forage Management III: Bunk Management

    Silage is the cornerstone of many conventional dairy rations. Maintaining quality through proper harvest, storage, and feedout is key for a successful feeding program. Once the silage is properly tucked away in the bunker and thoroughly covered it can be stored for extended periods of time until it’s opened up.   Read More...

  • Forage Management II: The Harvest

    Determining when to harvest your forages is critical for the success of your forage program. Harvesting at the correct dry matter and maturation is necessary for proper fermentation and quality forage. These values differ between forage types.   Read More...

  • Forage Management I: Preparation

    The summer is going by quickly, and before we know it, this year’s corn crop will be ready to harvest for silage. Planning ahead can help to make sure that everything is ready for the silage harvest and makes certain that the best job possible is being done to reduce shrink and ensure that the stored crop will be a great source of feed. Preparing the Storage Site Is there a clean, open area that will allow for easy filling and packing of the silage?   Read More...

  • Transition Periods - Change is Tough

    Coming home from a two week vacation can be a painful adjustment back to real life. For dairy cows, transitioning back into the milking herd after a 55 – 60 day vacation can be even more stressful. She won’t be worried about office gossip she missed; she is adjusting to the rigor of producing upwards of 80, 90, even 100+ lbs of milk/day.   Read More...

  • Hot & Humid I - Cows

    If you walk into your dairy barn and you can smell burgers grilling and hear steaks sizzling it might be time to look into methods to cool those girls down. As we head into the summer months and the temperature starts rising, we need to consider methods for heat abatement for our cattle. Heat stress not only affects intake, but immune function, growth, fetal development, and rumen health as well.   Read More...

  • Hot & Humid II - Calves

    Calves are susceptible to heat stress as well, though it might not be as apparent as it is with older cattle. Higher temperatures can lead to decreased feed efficiency and average daily gain. Calves can also experience a lowered immune status due to the added stress of hot weather.   Read More...

  • Milk Replacer vs. Milk

    Debating over milk or milk replacer is much like debating which came first, the chicken or the egg. Everyone has an opinion but is there really one right answer? Maybe not.   Read More...

  • Proper Handling of Forage Inoculants

    Forage inoculants are products that contain specific strains of anaerobic bacteria that promote forage fermentation. The premise behind forage inoculants is that they help to ensure adequate amounts of the correct types of bacteria to expedite the fermentation process. Using a microbial inoculant can be a great management tool to improve forage quality.   Read More...

  • Summertime Feed Management

    Rising temperatures and increasing humidity can make feeds and feeders mold growing machines and can degrade pellet quality. Proper storing of feeds and maintenance of feeders will help prevent mold growth and reduce fines. Considerations for storing grain-based feeds Molds grow in warm, wet environments making the heat and humidity of summer the perfect season for mold growth.   Read More...

  • Are Worms Eating Your Profits?

    Internal parasites can cause significant decreases in productivity in both beef and dairy operations. Instituting a timely and effective deworming schedule will keep cattle healthier and increase profitability. Safe-Guard is a highly effective dewormer that can be fed at the bunk or dosed orally.   Read More...

  • Colostrum

    Upon birth, calves have little to no circulating immunoglobulins (also known as antibodies). Calves acquire immunoglobulins through the ingestion of colostrum during the first 24 hours of life with the greatest rate of absorption occurring in the first 6 – 12 hours. For a Holstein calf, recommendations indicate that they should consume, at minimum, 1 gallon of good quality colostrum.   Read More...

  • Fly Season is Coming

    Flies are a nuisance to animals and people alike, but they can be controlled. Good sanitation combined with fly abatement products can help suppress a fly infestation. Most flies reproduce in the manure.   Read More...

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